Is it OK to have sex if I have Peyronie’s disease?

DR. HERAZY,

MY PEYRONIE’S PROBLEM STARTED A FEW MONTHS AGO AND I HAVE A 30 DEGREE UPWARD BEND. WE STOPPED HAVING SEX. MY WIFE IS AFRAID SHE WILL DAMAGE IT MORE. MY UROLOGIST PRESCRIBED VERAPAMIL CREAM WHICH IS NOT HAVING MUCH AFFECT.WHAT NATURAL TREATMENT I CAN APPLY TO CURE THE PROBLEM? AND SHOULD I DO ANYTHING TO PROTECT MY PENIS DURING DAYTIME FROM PRESSURE OF ANY KIND, OR APPLY A FIRM UNDERLINING support to keep it straight?

 

Greetings,

There is much to say here.

First, do not stop your sexual activity; it is important that you basically continue as you always have, with the exception that you must be much more careful and defensive with your technique.  This is a huge subject, so perhaps to really understand it best you should get my book, “Peyronie’s Disease and Sex.”  It will help both of you to understand how to have a full sex life in spite of Peyronies.

Fewer doctors are using verapamil because of limited results – and you have seen this to be true for yourself already.  For more information, see my article,  “Peyronie’s and Verapamil.”     

Next, when you ask what kind of Peyronies treatment you can use to help yourself with your PD it is obvious you have not spent any time looking at the PDI website; it is loaded with hundreds of pages of information to answer this question.   

You must protect your penis to prevent additional injury during sexual activity.  You do not have to worry about light contact or pressure during the day.   To protect the penis during sexual activity we have assembled a great list of effective penis supports that will reduce the chance of re-injury by sudden buckling or bending during intercourse.    Go to Sex Supports and Marital Aides.     You never want to force your bent penis to make it straight.  Once you start treating your PD and you begin to cause your internal scar tissue to get reabsorbed your penis will be able to naturally straighten out.   Before that happens do not apply pressure to reduce your curved penis to make it straight.         

You really need to spend some time educating yourself in this critically important subject so you will know how to protect and assist yourself.    Probably the best single thing you can do to understand how all of this operates and how to help yourself is to get my first book, “Peyronie’s Disease Handbook.”  TRH

Why didn’t the first skin graft take?

I had peyronie's surgery back on 19 Sept 11.  My urologist removed two large masses which he told me was scar tissue. He also said he repaired the areas with grafts. It has been almost two month now and I have a 1 1/2 x 2" open wound on the shaft of my penis. I continue to keep it clean and bandaged but it does not seem to be healing. I've been told by another urologist that I need another skin graft. 

Unfortuntatetly I'm currently depolyed to Afghanistan and not scheduled to return until June.    Why didn't the first skin graft take?   Is there a risk in waiting until I return back to the states?

Thanks

Tony

 

Greetings Tony,

Thank your, sir, for standing tall and strong to protect the freedom we all enjoy.   Our thoughts and prayers are with you and your brave comrades.   

There are several possible reasons why your post-surgical wound is not healing, that you should have your doctor explore for you:  diabetes, reduced local circulation, poor wound care, heavy aspirin usage, compromised immune system and poor nutrition.  Any of these can contribute to this situation and perhaps others if someone takes a close look at you. 

The complication rate for Peyronie's disease surgery is higher than for many other types of surgery.   This is why I always strongly encourage men to do whatever they can to avoid this radical option until all conservative options have been explored.   

The sooner you begin your healing and wound closing the better.   If no one seems to be listening to your problem, I  suggest you contact your home town congressman to work to get you some help and attention.     TRH

Is there a “sex toy or tool” to prevent additonal injury to my Peyronie’s penis?

Good day! 

Doctor,

Is there any "sex toy or tool" that can help not to get more injured when masturbating?

Thanks for being available to us  PD Warriors.

Greetings,

You are welcome, and thanks for being a Warrior.   It is my pleasure and my obligation to tell people about how to help themselves recover from Peyronie's disease without drugs or surgery.

For years I have listed a nice size group of such "Peyronies sex toy' items on the PDI website because they can indeed protect and support the shaft during intercourse and help prevent further injury when you already have Peyronies.   When the shaft is bent, curved, dented  or narrowed due to the underlying scar material it is extremely vulnerable to injury by collapsing or folding over during the rigors of intercourse and masturbation.  Any man with such a penile deformity should look at these devices to see what appeals to him – and use it to prevent additional harm.   Go to PDI store front and scroll down until you see the penis support devices to be used during intercourse.  

Of course, it is always best to slow down, use a reasonable and cautious technique while masturbating, and use plenty of sexual lubricant to avoid additional injury while masturbating.   Vibrators are always a safe tool to use since little friction or force is used.   TRH

How to know which plan to use for Peyronie’s treatment?

How to know which plan is suitable for mein medication section?  My condition is similar to bent on the left and hour glass constriction at the base.  I am 40 years old and using size genetics also.

Greetings, 

There is no way to know exactly which plan you should use for your Peyronie's disease.   You start with a plan that makes sense to you, that you can find time in your day to put to good use, that you can afford the expenses, and you begin care.  As you use that plan you monitor the size, shape, density and surface features of your scar for changes.  If you notice changes in your scar, you continue that plan you are using.  If you do not notice changes in your scar, you slowly increase your plan until you do begin to notice scar changes.  It is not complicated.  

Many men find that their Peyronie's disease started after using a mechanical penis stretching device.  It is my opinion they are all very dangerous. See  "Penis Extender Claims and Peyronie's Disease."

Please review the PDI website for information about a much safer way to treat your problem.  TRH       

Peyronie’s disease and pain in the penis

Penis injury during sex common cause of Peyronie’s disease 

Nothing will get a man’s attention more than when his penis hurts.

There are typically two ways in which a painful penis can develop:  after direct penis injury, or as a result of some type of medical health problem or sickness affecting the urinary system.  When the penis hurts because of suspected disease of the prostate gland, bladder or urethra there are few clear cut answers to penis pain with the exact location, duration, and quality of penis pain different from case to case, without good explanation.   You will notice that some men with prostatitis have pain at the base of the penis, while other men with the same diagnosis have pain at the tip of the penis, and other men no penis pain at all.  Men who have a painful penis are often surprised that their condition is never given a definite diagnosis to explain its cause.

This discussion will focus primarily on a particular type of painful traumatic event peculiar to Peyronie’s disease that can either cause or worsen an existing penile problem, as with an injury during intercourse.

Peyronie’s treatment

Regardless of how Peyronie’s disease starts, surgery and drugs are not always needed to reduce the pain and penile distortion it causes. Since 2002 the Peyronie’s Disease Institute has worked with people from around the world to use natural Alternative Medicine methods to help their body reverse the Peyronie’s scar naturally. While surgery is always an option, most people prefer to first use non-surgical treatment to possibly avoid the inherent risks of surgery.

Learn more about Peyronie’s disease treatment with Alternative Medicine. Another good source of information is the Peyronie’s Disease Handbook.

Medical conditions that can cause penis pain

It is important to know that several common disease conditions not related to penile injury can also cause dull and sharp pain in the penis and should not be ignored, especially if you have other unexplained symptoms related to the pelvis or urinary system:

  • Peyronie's disease
  • Bladder stone
  • Cancer of the penis
  • Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis)
  • Reiter syndrome
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Erection that does not go away (priapism) after 4 hours – medical emergency
  • Genital herpes
  • Syphilis
  • Urethra inflammation caused by chlamydia or gonorrhea
  • Infected or defective penile prosthesis
  • Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men (balanitis)
  • Pimples or insect bites on the head or shaft of the penis

Because any of these conditions can cause a deeply hurt penis, it is always best to rule out disease of the urinary system by going to your family doctor for a complete examination with any type of pains in the penis.  If you do not have a medical health problem, then a painful penis is usually explained by past trauma to the genitals or pelvis.  Even minor trauma can at times cause significant penile injury with varying degrees of pain and other symptoms.  One of the reasons that traumatic penis damage is often not suspected as the cause of genital pain is that there is sometimes a delayed response between the time of injury and when the penis pain begins.  It is rather common for a man to discover that a penis injury during sex that started his Peyronies disease might not cause discomfort until several weeks or months afterward.  Probably the single-most common way for PD to start is from a forcefully bent penis during sex.

Penile fracture or broken penis syndrome – Common way to hurt penis during sex

Even though there are no bones in the penis, penile fracture and broken penis syndrome are legitimate medical terms.  Both refer to a sudden and forceful bending injury of the erect penis, resulting in torn or ruptured internal tissue.  Many times a penile fracture will occur as a result of injury during sex activity when an erection is suddenly and forcefully impacted at the tip of the penis, almost like being punched in the nose.  When the force is sudden and unexpected the vulnerable shaft can painfully sustain a sharp bend, “breaking” the inner layer of penile tissue called the tunica albuginea membrane, as well as other tissues.  The forceful impact that causes a penile fracture most commonly happens during heightened sexual activity with the female partner in the superior position; other sexual positions allow for this to happen but this is the classic situation that results in a penile fracture.  Within just a second of time she will pull back too far, lose contact with the male, and then continue back down on top of the erection impacting the penis head with her pubic, inguinal or inner thigh area.  The initial immediate pain can be very mild or severe, depending on many variables, yet sufficient to tear the tunica when it is stretched tight during an erection.

The tunica albuginea surrounds the two corpora cavernosa chambers, specialized elongated masses of spongy tissue of the penis that fill with blood to create an erection.  In a penile fracture, because the torn tunica albuginea can no longer trap blood inside the penile chambers, blood that is normally confined within the penile chambers can freely leak out to surrounding tissue often resulting significant bruising and swelling, in addition to varying degrees of pain in the penis.

About half of men who undergo penis injury similar to the above, or even compression injury during a work-, sports- or auto-related accidents, will self-heal and repair the problem with the tunica albuginea without developing Peyronie’s disease.   The other half of cases will not heal, and it will slowly and gradually worsen as Peyronie’s disease develops over time.

Pain in tip of penis

Men with Peyronie’s disease sometimes have pain in the tip of the penis, although this is somewhat unusual because the pain of PD is usually located along the shaft or even base of the penis.  Although pain in the penile tip could be related to Peyronies, it is more likely due to reflex from the prostate gland; prostatitis often will refer pain to the tip of the penis.  As a point of differentiation, prostatitis will often increase urinary frequency, reduce the force and volume of urine, burning in the penile tip unrelated to voiding, reduced erectile ability, blood in the urine and semen, and aching pain is possible in the penis, testicles, rectum, perineum, groin and lower abdomen and low back.  Prostatitis can be precipitated by too frequent or too infrequent ejaculation, sexual arousal without ejaculation, withdrawal at the time of ejaculation, aggressive bike or horseback riding, excessive spicy foods, alcohol, and caffeine, as well as prolonged sitting especially in an automobile.

A similar complaint is burning at the tip of the penis.  When this occurs it suggests the possibility of an STD (sexually transmitted disease) or an infection of the urinary tract.   Generally, an STD is associated with a change of sexual partners, and can be variable from few a few subtle symptoms to marked genital pain during intercourse, discharge, itching and pain burning pain in the penis tip during urination.  STDs are serious problems that demand prompt and aggressive medical diagnosis and care.   A common urinary infection is suspected if you feel the need for frequent urination or notice that you need to urinate again within a few minutes.

Pain at base of penis

Pain at the base of the penis is perhaps most often explained as originating from a chronic bacterial infection of the prostate (chronic bacterial prostatitis).  This problem often comes and goes over time without apparent reason.   During a flare-up the penis pain can be dull or sharp, and extend to the testicles and anus as well as the pubic bone in front or the low back.  Bowel movements may be painful at this time.  It is also common to note frequent urgency of urination, pain when urinating or during ejaculation. While these symptoms are similar to an acute bacterial prostatitis, men who have a flare-up of chronic bacterial prostatitis tend to be less run down, feverish and ill-feeling than with acute prostatitis.