Honso Herbs for Peyronie’s Treatment

Honso Japanese Herbs for Peyronie’s Disease Therapy

Herbs and plants have been used as medicine in every civilized culture since the beginning of recorded time, and I have found them to be a logical part of Peyronie’s disease treatment.  It was not that long ago that herbal medicine was essentially the only kind of medicine available for the world’s population – and we did pretty well with it.   An excellent blend of herbs are available today to round out your Peyronie’s disease treatment plan.

Eber’s papyrus informs us that in 3,500 BC Egyptians chewed on myrtle leaves, and we know that in America the native Indian chewed on the bark of the white willow tree, to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. It was not until 1829 that both of these remedies were found to contain salicin (salicylic acid), the active ingredient responsible for these benefits. Guided by this ancient information, on March 6, 1889 the German company, Bayer, patented aspirin. This is just one example of folk remedies and simple cause and effect observations being far ahead of science. Today up to 75% of the world population still relies on herbal medicines. More than 50% of medicines used in the U.S. are of plant origin. Eventually science catches up to common folks, but only after first soundly condemning what it does not understand.

Two famous 1,000 year-old Japanese herbal formulas, keishi-bukuryo-gan (KBG) and hachimi-jio-gan (HJG), are other examples of ancient knowledge being discovered and examined by science today. They are used also in China where each has an equally difficult name; KBG is known as gui-zhi-fu-ling-wan, and HJG is known as bai wei di huang wan.

KBG has gotten a lot of interest in the last 20 years because of its great reputation with several problems: various menstrual and menopausal complaints(1-5), endometriosis(6) and uterine fibroids(7-8), poor circulation(9-10) stroke(11) and atherosclerosis.(12) Because of the widespread use of KBG to treat many conditions, a deliberate effort was made to learn more about it and to determine if there were additional areas of potential use. This investigation and study brought out many discoveries about KBG and some might even apply, indirectly of course, to PD.

HJG has also been researched extensively, confirming several important areas in which it demonstrates possible use: fatigue(13), kidney disease(14-15) bone healing(16), benign prostate hyperplasia(17-19), poor circulation(20), weak immune response(21-26), insomnia(27), poor digestion(28, 29), osteoporosis(30), memory impairment(31), male infertility(32), diabetes(33), and cataracts.(34, 35)

Don’t be confused by these last two paragraphs. They are presented for two reasons: To show that extensive research has been done on these two herbal remedies to understand how they work. Second, to verify they actually do effect a wide and diverse range of systems and areas of the body to influence health. This information just displays that each can affect the biochemistry of the body, that’s all. Which of the two might be of help to you is discussed below.

Commentary:  Standard medical “wait-and-see treatment” of Peyronie’s disease, click Peyronie’s Disease and Man Whose House is on Fire.

Understanding acupuncture and Peyronie’s care concepts

There is no way to fully explain acupuncture and Asian healing concepts here. It would take hours of reading for only a slight understanding of what these herbs can do for PD. Therefore, please understand the topic of this paragraph will not be explained fully or provide a full understanding of Oriental healing. With that in mind, according to the concepts of acupuncture and yin/yang philosophy, PD is an example of stagnant energy or chi. Yes, that’s correct. The acupuncturist would approach the problem of PD from the entirely different direction of simple energy, not the scar itself. While he or she would admit there is a scar in the tunica albuginea and all the other anatomy, chemistry, and physiology you know about PD from a Western scientific basis, yet the acupuncturist would ignore that Western knowledge and work from the entirely different viewpoint of “stuck energy”. It sounds strange and incorrect to the Western mind, but perfectly sensible to the Eastern mind. So in this context – while recognizing and agreeing the excess collagen build up created the scar in the tunica does exist, and is the basis of PD – the acupuncturist would temporarily ignore all of that, and approach Peyronie’s disease energetically. Since the acupuncture diagnosis is that the PD lump is stagnant energy, treatment would be to simply get the energy to move enabling it to spread throughout the body.

These two herbal remedies under discussion are part of a larger system of acupuncture treatment that moves stagnated, or stuck, energy that has precipitated into a lump anywhere in the body. These are wonderful herbal products with amazing ability to influence the body – just as they have for thousands of years.

Only one product is used – either KBG or HJG – based on body type and constitution; they are not taken together. While both have a widespread effect on multiple areas of the body and health in general, each works best for a specific constitution type. To get maximum benefit from either KBG or HJG it is first necessary to figure out which of the two fundamental types you represent. Although you might recognize yourself in both columns, you will find one list describes you better than the other.

Look at the lists below, and determine which of the two describes you most closely:

KBG Type                                                                           HJG Type

1. Aggressive, forceful                                                     1. Easy going, passive

2. Confident nature                                                           2. Self-doubting nature

3. High energy person                                                     3. Low energy person

4. Doesn’t need much sleep                                           4. Needs a lot of sleep

5. Ruddy, good color to complexion                        5. Pale complexion

6. Full face                                                                            6. Thin face

7. Muscular or stocky body frame                            7. Average or small bone frame, frail

8. Healthy nature, not sick easily                              8. Long medical history, gets sick easily

9. Likes cold                                                                       9. Likes warmth

10. Dislikes heat                                                                10. Dislikes cold

11. Prone to headaches                                                   11. Many problems with legs, weak legs

12. Good circulation                                                        12. Cold feet and hands

13. Shoulders ache                                                           13. Prostate problems

KBG and HJG are effective in such a wide variety of conditions because they each impact on many basic biochemical processes:

  • Free radical elimination
  • Improvement of blood flow
  • Strengthen immune response after injury
  • Promote functional organ activity
  • Improve red blood cell structure and function
  • Prevent progression of fibrous tissue buildup after injury

Science

Perhaps the most likely explanation for the potential benefit of KBG to scleroderma, and perhaps KBG’s benefit to PD also, comes from its strong free radical scavenging activity. What is interesting to note about KBG is that the level and degree of free radical activity is concentration-dependent, meaning the greater the concentration or dose the greater the free radical scavenging response.(36,37) With this in mind, you can attempt to help yourself further by pushing the dosage to a reasonably high level for maximum potential benefit. Further studies have gone on to suggest this strong protection from free radical activity inhibits the early stage of atherosclerosis (38) in which fibrous tissue build-up takes place in the walls of the blood vessels in response to free radical release by PMNs. This same effect occurs in a similar way in red blood cells.(39)

Peyronie’s disease connection

Of course, the last entry above, about preventing progression of fibrous tissue buildup after injury makes KBG and HJG important to PD. All of these findings are of indirect benefit to PD. Each of the two herbal formulas work to move stagnant energy, and from an Eastern standpoint this is why each can be considered potentially beneficial to PD. One is not better than the other. One is selected over the other based on how your body energy works with the herbal energy of KBG and HJG.

Western research is currently taking a closer look at KBG than HJG. This does not mean KBG is better or more effective than HJG; it just means that KBG has a peculiar property that is of keen interest right now to the researchers. It just so happens KBG has a favorable effect on our old friend, scleroderma. As reported in earlier sections, scleroderma is a condition of unknown cause and irregular course of progression that causes a hardening and thickening of fibrous elements of the skin. Scleroderma has enough similarity to PD, to suggest that what is beneficial to scleroderma has reasonable potential to also help PD. So this is a double PD connection.

In both Japan and China KBG been used with success to treat scleroderma, even though they do not have a clear explanation for how and why it works. However, there is one research report(40) in particular that is most close to PD, even though once again there is no direct emphasis to PD. The abstract of this study comments that KBG “significantly and selectively inhibited collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with a tendency of a stronger effect on scleroderma.” This is, of course, a good explanation for why KBG is effective in treating scleroderma, but it is also good news for those with PD because of the similarity of tissue changes at the root of both conditions.

If your body type directs you to use HJG, then that is the formula you should consider. Do not be swayed by all the publicity KBG has received. Maybe next year more research will come out finding the same things about KBG are also true for HJG. Just keep in mind that not only do these herbs do great things for the body from an Eastern standpoint, but they can be proven from a Western standpoint as well.

KBG and HJG are herbal preparations that have enjoyed popular use in China and Japan, because of their widespread benefits, for over 1,000 years. Just recently science has found good evidence that they influence body chemistry and physiology in beneficial ways. Also, from an Eastern or acupuncture standpoint, KBG and HJG work to move blocked or stagnated energy in the body. Either way you look at it – Western or Eastern – they might be able to help your PD.

PDI recommends if you are strongly a KBG or HJG type of individual, that you give serious consideration to the use of that particular herbal formula. In other words, the more you see yourself described in either type the more you could benefit from the use of that remedy. The use of Oriental herbals in your therapy plan gives you strong diversity of direction and broadens your effort to support your tissue response to PD.

Commercial product information

This concludes the technical discussion concerning JAPANESE HERBS. What follows next is the presentation of commercial information about a particular product that PDI endorses and sells in its Natural Complementary Medicine Products division. PDI does this so that you may easily identify what we think is the best therapy product of its kind, and then make it available for sale easily and at the best price we can.

Please bear in mind that PDI cannot answer your questions or help you with your therapy plan if we do not have knowledge, experience or confidence with “foreign” therapies. On the PDI website we clearly state, “Sorry, but due to the volume of emails PDI receives and with limited hours available in a day, we can only answer questions from PDI customers. When you purchase your therapy products only from PDI you have full access to the vast experience and careful assistance available to our customers. If you purchase inferior grade or questionable bargain products elsewhere, you will have to rely upon that source for whatever help you might need later.”

We take this position because after doing this work since 2002 we sincerely believe that you stand a better chance to reverse your PD if you only use products listed in the PDI and Natural Complementary Medicine websites.

Herbal product recommendation

Honso Herbs are prescribed in Japan by MDs just like a drug.  These herbs can be that effective as a part of your Peyronie's disease treatment plan
Honso Herbs

HONSO HERBS Honso Kampo Herbal Company utilizes Western methods to create Eastern herbal formulas. The products and formulae from this company are used in hospital and university research, something that cannot be said of many similar companies. Since 1967 the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (the same government office as the U.S. FDA that regulates pharmaceutical manufacturers) has approved 148 Kampo formulas for coverage and reimbursement in Japan’s national health insurance plan. Today, 75% of Japanese MDs prescribe Kampo formulas for their patients.

Honso Kampo Herbal Company has an outstanding reputation in the field, and PDI is proud to have their KBG and HJG products available for your use.

Suggested herbal therapy for Peyronie’s disease

Begin herbal therapy slowly, to accustom your body to the various changes that will occur as a result of energy movement. Start with two capsules daily, divided at the morning and evening meal. After a week, increase to four daily also divided at the morning and evening meal.

For ideas and suggestions to put Honso Japanese herbs  with other therapies, read Create a Peyronie’s Treatment Plan.

Order herbs

Why Buy from PDI?

1. Service PDI offers email support and assistance for the products and services we provide. We provide experience and interest in helping you with PD. PDI is here to help you with questions about the products we sell. This is an extremely valuable service the others cannot possibly match.

2. Quality and Quantity Repairing the Peyronie’s scar is such an important mission. It is critical you use a high quality and quantity of nutrients. We have done the hard part selecting good companies and products. Buy with confidence.

3. Value PDI has a competitive pricing structure of which we are proud. We doubt you can find better products that deliver the quality and quantity for the prices we have set.

4. Convenience The longer you take to start treating PD, the longer and more difficult treatment becomes, and the likelihood of success deteriorates. Everything you need is here, right now, in one place.

1. Sakamoto S, Kudo H, Kawasaki T, Kuwa K, Kasahara N, Sassa S, Okamoto R. Effects of a Chinese herbal medicine, keishi-bukuryo-gan, on the gonadal system of rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 1988 Jul-Aug;23(2-3):151-8 Department of Endocrinology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

2. Chen JT, Shiraki M.Menopausal hot flash and calciotonin gene-related peptide; effect of Keishi-bukuryo-gan, a kampo medicine, related to plasma calciotonin gene-related peptide level. Maturitas. 2003 Jul 25;45(3):199-204. JT Chen Clinic, Sunbright Twin 3F, 2-46-1 Honcho, Nakano-Ku, Tokyo 164-0012, Japan.

3. Noguchi M, Ikarashi Y, Yuzurihara M, Kase Y, Chen JT, Takeda S, Aburada M, Ishige A. Effects of the Japanese herbal medicine Keishi-bukuryo-gan and 17beta-estradiol on calcitonin gene-related peptide-induced elevation of skin temperature in ovariectomized rats. Endocrinol. 2003 Mar;176(3):359-66. Tsumura Research Institute Medical Evaluation Laboratory, 3586 Yoshiwara, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-1192, Japan.

4. 4. Sekiya N, Goto H, Tazawa K, Oida S, Shimada Y, Terasawa K. Keishi-bukuryo-gan preserves the endothelium dependent relaxation of thoracic aorta in cholesterol-fed rabbit by limiting superoxide generation. Phytother Res. 2002 Sep;16(6):524-8. Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani 2630, Japan.

5. Sakamoto S, Mitamura T, Iwasawa M, Kitsunai H, Shindou K, Yagishita Y, Zhou YF, Sassa S. Conservative management for perimenopausal women with uterine leiomyomas using Chinese herbal medicines and synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In Vivo. 1998 May-Jun;12(3):333-7.Department of Endocrinology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

6. Tanaka T, Mizuno K, Umesaki N, Ogita S. A preliminary immunopharmacological study of an antiendometriotic herbal medicine, Keishi-bukuryo-gan. Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Osaka City University Medical School, Japan.

7. Tanaka T. Effects of herbal medicines on menopausal symptoms induced by gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy. Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol. 2001;28(1):20-3. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka, Japan.

8. Sakamoto S, Yoshino H, Shirahata Y, Shimodairo K, Okamoto R.Pharmacotherapeutic effects of kuei-chih-fu-ling-wan (keishi-bukuryo-gan) on human uterine myomas. Am J Chin Med. 1992;20(3-4):313-7.Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

9. Yakugaku Zasshi. Ueda J, Ohya E, Udagawa K, Hara A, Fukui M, Yamagishi H, Nakazawa T, Yasuda T, Ohsawa K. Effect of Kampo medicines on the peripheral blood flow rate of betamethason-induced Oketsu syndrome mice by laser Doppler flow meter. Department of Phytochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, Sendai, Japan.2004 Jun;124(6):365-9. [Article in Japanese]

10. Goto H, Shimada Y, Sekiya N, Yang Q, Kogure T, Mantani N, Hikiami H, Shibahara N, Terasawa K. Effects of Keishi-bukuryo-gan on vascular function and hemorheological factors in spontaneously diabetic (WBN/kob) rats. Phytomedicine. 2004 Feb;11(2-3):188-95. Faculty of Medicine, and Department of Kampo Diagnostics, Institute of Natural Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.

11. Fushitani S, Minakuchi K, Tsuchiya K, Takasugi M, Murakami K. [Studies on attenuation of post-ischemic brain injury by kampo medicines-inhibitory effects of free radical production. II] Yakugaku Zasshi. 1995 Aug;115(8):611-7 [Article in Japanese] Department of Pharmacy, Tokushima University Hospital, Japan.

12. Sekiya N, Tanaka N, Itoh T, Shimada Y, Goto H, Terasawa K. Keishi-bukuryo-gan prevents the progression of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbit. Phytother Res. 1999 May;13(3):192-6. Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.

13. Ninomiya H, Kato S, Okuda H. Effects of Hachimi-jio-gan in aged rats. J Altern Complement Med. 2001 Aug;7(4):355-9. Second Department of Medical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Ehime University, Japan.

14. Yokozawa T, Yamabe N, Cho EJ, Nakagawa T, Oowada S. A study on the effects to diabetic nephropathy of Hachimi-jio-gan in rats. Nephron Exp Nephrol. 2004;97(2):e38-48. Institute of Natural Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, Japan.

15. Hirawa N, Uehara Y, Kawabata Y, Numabe A, Takada S, Nagoshi H, Gomi T, Ikeda T, Omata M. Hachimi-jio-gan extract protects the kidney from hypertensive injury in Dahl salt-sensitive rat. Am J Chin Med. 1996;24(3-4):241-54. Department of Nephrology, Kantoh-Teishin Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

16. Song QH, Kobayashi T, Hosoi T, Cyong JC. Effects of traditional Chinese medicines on murine bone metabolism in a microgravity environment. Am J Chin Med. 2003;31(5):739-49. Department of Bioregulatory Function, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

17. Yoshimura K, Terai A, Arai Y. [Two-week administration of low-dose Hachimi-jio-gan (Ba-Wei Di-Huang-Wan) for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia] Hinyokika Kiyo. 2003 Sep;49(9):509-14 [Article in Japanese] Department of Urology, Kurashiki Central Hospital.

18. Ishizuka O, Nishizawa O, Hirao Y, Ohshima S. Evidence-based meta-analysis of pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hypertrophy.Int J Urol. 2002 Nov;9(11):607-12. Department of Urology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Asahi, Matsumoto, Japan.

19. Sakamoto S, Kudo H, Kawasaki T, Kasahara N, Okamoto R.Effect of ba-wei-di-huang-wan (hachimi-jio-gan) on thymidine kinase and its isozyme activities in the prostate glands in rats. Am J Chin Med. 1988;16(1-2):29-36. Department of Endocrinology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

20. Isobe H, Yamamoto K, Cyong JC.Effects of hachimi-jio-gan (ba-wei-di-huang-wan) on blood flow in the human central retinal artery. Department of Bioregulatory Function, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan.

21. Furuya Y, Kawakita T, Nomoto K. Suppressive effect of a traditional Japanese medicine, Hachimi-jio-gan (Ba-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan), on the hyperresponsiveness to IL-18 in autoimmune MRL/MPJ-lpr/lpr mice. Int Immunopharmacol. 2003 Mar;3(3):365-73. Department of Clinical Development and Pharmacology, Kanebo Kampo and Healthcare Research Laboratories, 3-1, Kanebo-machi, Takaoka 933-0856, Japan.

22. Terawaki K, Nose M, Ogihara Y. The effects of crude polysaccharide fractions of 4 kinds of kampo-hozai administered orally on nitric oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages. Biol Pharm Bull. 1997 Jul;20(7):809-11. Department of Pharmacognosy and Plant Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Japan.

23. Hirokawa S, Nose M, Amagaya S, Oyama T, Ogihara Y.Protective effect of hachimi-jio-gan, an oriental herbal medicinal mixture, against cerebral anoxia. J Ethnopharmacol. 1993 Dec;40(3):201-6. Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Japan.

24. Furuya Y. Kawakita T. Nomoto K. Immunomodulating effect of a traditional Japanese medicine, hachimi-jio-gan (ba-wei-di-huang-wan), on Th1 predominance in autoimmune MRL/MP-lpr/lprmice. International Immunopharmacology. 1(3):551-9, 2001 Mar. Department of Pharmacology, Healthcare Research Laboratories, 5-90 Tomobuchi-Cho I-Chome, Miyakozima, Osaka 534-0016, Japan.

25. Mantle, David; Pickering, Anne T.; Perry, Elaine K. Cns Drugs. 13(3):201-213, March 2000. Medicinal Plant Extracts for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of their Pharmacology, Efficacy and Tolerability.[Review] Medicinal Plant Research Centre, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, England

26. Sakushima J. Nose M. Ogihara Y. Effect of hachimi-jio-gan on immunoglobulin A producing cells in Peyer’s patch by oral administration. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin. 20(11):1175-7, 1997 Nov. Department of Pharmacognosy and Plant Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Japan.

27. Yasui T, Matsuzaki T, Ushigoe K, Kuwahara A, Maegawa M, Furumoto H, Aono T, Irahara M. Stimulatory effect of the herbal medicine Keishi-bukuryo-gan on a cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, in rat ovarian cell culture. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2003 Jul;50(1):90-7. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

28. Watanabe H, Kobayashi T, Tomii M, Sekiguchi Y, Uchida K, Aoki T, Cyong JC. Effects of Kampo herbal medicine on plasma melatonin concentration in patients. Am J Chin Med. 2002;30(1):65-71.Department of Bioregulatory Function, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.

29. Yamasaki K, Kajimura K, Nakano M, Yokoyama H, Yoneda K, Umezawa C. Effects of preparations of Chinese medicinal prescriptions on digestive enzymes in vitro and in vivo. Biol Pharm Bull. 1998 Feb;21(2):133-9. Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public Health, Japan.

30. Yamasaki K. Kajimura K. Nakano M. Yokoyama H. Yoneda K. Umezawa C. Effects of preparations of Chinese medicinal prescriptions on digestive enzymes in vitro and in vivo. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin. 21(2):133-9, 1998 Feb. Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public Health, Japan.

31. Hidaka S, Okamoto Y, Nakajima K, Suekawa M, Liu SY. Preventive effects of traditional Chinese (Kampo) medicines on experimental osteoporosis induced by ovariectomy in rats. Calcif Tissue Int. 1997 Sep;61(3):239-46. Department of Oral Biochemistry, Fukuoka Dental College, 15-1, Tamura 2-Chome, Sawara-Ku, Fukuoka, 814-01, Japan.

32. Hirokawa S, Nose M, Ishige A, Amagaya S, Oyama T, Ogihara Y.

Effect of Hachimi-jio-gan on scopolamine-induced memory impairment and on acetylcholine content in rat brain. J Ethnopharmacol. 1996 Feb;50(2):77-84. Department of Pharmacognosy, Nagoya City University, Japan.

33. Amano T, Kunimi K, Ohkawa M. Analysis of fluorescence spectra from Chinese herbal medicine for male infertility. Am J Chin Med. 1995;23(3-4):213-21.Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Japan.

34. Shoji M, Sato H, Hirai Y, Oguni Y, Sugimoto C, Morishita S, Ito C.

[Pharmacological effects of Gosha-jinki-gan-ryo extract: effects on experimental diabetes] Nippon Yakurigaku Zasshi. 1992 Mar;99(3):143-52.

[Article in Japanese] Research Laboratories, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.

35. Kamei A, Hisada T, Iwata S. The evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of hachimi-jio-gan (traditional Chinese medicine) to mouse hereditary cataract. J Ocul Pharmacol. 1988 Winter;4(4):311-9. Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan.

36. Sheng FY; Ohta A; Yamaguchi M. Inhibition of collagen production by traditional Chinese herbal medicine in scleroderma fibroblast cultures. Department of Internal Medicine, Saga Medical School. mIntern Med (Japan) Aug 1994, 33 (8) p466-38.

37. Fushitani S, Tsuchiya K, Minakuchi K, Takasugi M, Murakami K. [Studies on attenuation of post-ischemic brain injury by kampo medicines-inhibitory effects of free radical production.] Yakugaku Zasshi. 1994 Jun;114(6):388-94.Department of Pharmacy, Tokushima University Hospital, Japan. [Article in Japanese]

38. Sekiya N, Tanaka N, Itoh T, Shimada Y, Goto H, Terasawa K. Keishi-bukuryo-gan prevents the progression of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbit. Phytother Res. 1999 May;13(3):192-6. Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.

39. Sekiya N, Goto H, Tazawa K, Oida S, Shimada Y, Terasawa K. Keishi-bukuryo-gan preserves the endothelium dependent relaxation of thoracic aorta in cholesterol-fed rabbit by limiting superoxide generation. Phytother Res. 2002 Sep;16(6):524-8. Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani 2630, Japan.

40. Kamei A, Hisada T, Iwata S. The evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of hachimi-jio-gan (traditional Chinese medicine) to rat galactosemic cataract. J Ocul Pharmacol. 1987 Fall;3(3):239-48. Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan.

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